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Mindfulness and Lovingkindness

Discussion in 'Mind, Body & Spirit' started by travelerjack, May 28, 2013.

  1. travelerjack

    travelerjack Member

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    Hi,

    I have searched all over for an answer to this but haven't found a straight one. I have been practicing mindfulness for about three months now and just recently tried a lovingkindness meditation.

    My question is, how often/what ratio should I do these two practices in? Is it best to alternate one for one, mindfulness one day, lovingkindness the next, or is better used less often than the other? The lovingkindness meditation made me feel really good, but I don't want to get sucked into doing it just to chase that feeling.

    I try to practice both of them throughout everyday activities, so my question is only really aimed at dedicated sessions of practice.
     
  2. GilesC

    GilesC Member

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    When you say you've been practicing mindfullness, do you mean mindfulness or do you mean a specific mindfulness meditation?

    Midnfullness itself comes from a philosophical knowledge that is put into practice in our daily lives, helping to increase our awareness of allow us to live in the present moment (or "living in the Now" as Eckhart Tolle would put it). If we practice mindfullness and living in the present moment, we don't suddely stop doing this in order to do something else. Yes, we may get distracted, but we don't consciously choose to stop being mindful, and mindfullness itself won't prevent us doing other things such that it needs to be stopped.

    If you are practicing mindfulness then true love, kindness etc. will naturally manifest as part of being mindful and more aware. So may I ask what you hope to achieve from a "lovingkindness" meditation, aside from the feeling you experience during the explicit practice of that particular meditation.

    Can you also explain what you do in a "dedicated session of practice" for mindfulness?

    Hugs

    Giles
     
  3. william.sharkey

    william.sharkey Member

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    When I first began to meditate I was doing it for a reason. I was a poker player at the time and I wanted to use meditation to make me less vulnerable to frustration at the table so that I would always make good decisions. But as I became less attached to my thought after meditating for some time I realized that there I dont need to meditate for any reason. The meditation, the letting go of thoughts, was reason in itself, I realized that I wanted to meditate for the sake of meditating, there need not be any ulterior reason or goal for me to do it. So I think anybody who is meditating correctly is going to come to this realization sooner or later, (sooner if like I said they truly meditate).
     

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