Fight or Flight Response V's Relaxation Response

Discussion in 'Learn How You Can Benefit From Project Meditation!' started by Michael Mackenzie, Dec 5, 2007.

  1. Michael Mackenzie

    Michael Mackenzie Owner

    Joined:
    Nov 25, 2007
    Messages:
    218
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    16
    When the fight or flight response happens our brain waves move into the higher Beta waves, producing heaps of cortisol which is known as the stress hormone and is extremely bad for your health.

    When we are in this state our blood flow is directed away from the brain and sent toward the periphery of the body, our bloodstream is flooded with sugar, our heart rate, blood pressure and breathing, rapidly increases, enabling us to prepare to defend ourselves by fighting or fleeing a dangerous situation.

    [​IMG]

    In this state, learning ability, as well as other mental functions including problem solving and reasoning ability are inhibited. This response is incredible and can indeed be life-saving.

    However many people experience this response on a regular basis through pressure at work, traffic jams, relationships and many more situations that are not life-threatening.

    To be in this state (increased blood pressure etc.) and not have to fight or run for our life is extremely disabling and explains why stress is indeed the biggest killer.

    What we need to create in our lives is the relaxation response. Regular practise of meditation will induce the production in the brain of alpha and theta brain waves, which will then reduce our heart rate and blood pressure, relax muscles, and increase the quantity of oxygen flow to the brain.

    Many researchers have noted that this state is so beneficial for super-learning, enhanced creativity and healing.

    The fight or flight response is accompanied by low amplitude, high frequency beta brain wave patterns in the brain, while the relaxation response so beneficial to learning and problem solving is accompanied by high amplitude, low frequency alpha and theta rhythms.

    Read more about brainwave states by clicking here

    By Michael Mackenzie :)
     

Share This Page