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EFT - Who uses it?

Discussion in 'Mind, Body & Spirit' started by Panthau, Mar 3, 2009.

  1. `Tired`

    `Tired` Member

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    Hi Pollyanna, :)

    Oh well at least I can say I played for a Lobos linage from Rio by means of Gismonti, that at least was an honor to meet him looking at the positive. I remember he looked at me after I had my head hung in shame, glancing up at him and he reached over and patted me on my left shoulder with some compassion in his eyes. He spoke although the words did not register with the shock of failing so critically still booming in my mind. Maybe he had been there too? I doubt it but perhaps?

    I looked around the classroom and all my friends looked like their faces were caught in slow motion expression of "Oh no...", my best friend had his jaw hanging on the floor with one hand on his forehead with an astonished look on his face...ugh. That moment of looking around seeing everyone's expressions is what really sticks with me the most, especially my instructor, although I doubt it is traumatic it is still disturbing and has led to the nasty "what if" thinking whenever I pick up a guitar in front of people. I play very rarely now as a result.

    The strange thing is that after reading this thread and discovering all of this that was hidden away from me, I recall more and more of it as I think about it. I remember asking my instructor if I could play some Fernando Sor or Bach and he was persistent that I play the piece I was unfamiliar with. I wonder what else is buried in this event? Interesting.

    You're right of course on all points. If my instructor had of been aware how influenced I was by players from Brazil especially those associated with Lobos linage he would have of picked someone who was clueless I suspect. Looking at the positive he was at least proud enough of me to pick me to represent him. It's hard to get over the fact of letting him down though I thought a lot of him. That really does make me feel bad for letting us both down.

    I never had a problem with failing until then. I mean I didn't like to fail but I always got back up and pressed forward. I need to try and tap this away maybe I will be able to play again if I can be rid of the negativity.

    I wish I could learn to like myself, I'm a work in progress I suppose?

    My apologies to everyone for the length of this post and stifling the thread, please continue.


    Thanks for the guidance and encouragement :)

    God Bless,

    Btw, I really enjoyed your thread about being thankful. :)
     
  2. `Tired`

    `Tired` Member

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    Hi Edwin,

    Thanks for the insight. You make a very good point as always! :) I have always seen myself as all the experiences I have had up until this point which makes it hard to let go of the trash. We're kind of like mathematical equations in a way. We have all these experiences which calculate who we are right now. The positive add to our confidence and self-esteem and the negative take away. The solution appears to be in determining how to negate the outstanding negative portions and learn how to be satisfied with what is left over. Being a perfectionist doesn't help. :p

    Peace and Blessings


    WeeHoo,

    In digging myself out of my pit, I have found present tense verbs work much better than future tense in life in general, meditation, thinking and speaking. Our tongues and thoughts most definitely can shape our future and our now by the way we choose to word something. I've learned to pick the way I word something very carefully these days, be it in my mind or if I am speaking. In a year of doing this my life has done a 180 from going straight to hell to looking tolerable for once in my life.

    Good luck in your EFT, I have barely just began mine and hope to learn more as this thread unfolds,

    Peace and God Bless.
     
  3. seatrend8899

    seatrend8899 Member

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    observation...

    Hi Tired,
    Just a quick thought about what you wrote on this thread from an LF newbie and totally in the dark on EFT.

    Tired, please do not apologize as the length of your post suited the utter importance of your sharing the experience with us. We all (on this forum) have negative experiences that we hope to deal with over time as meditators (EFT as well...though hopefully the free course details will be sufficient for me to learn the basics) and I thank you for sharing with us.

    And Tired, I hope that I can represent the group here by saying that anything you may want to express will not cause any "stifle effect" on any threads with us ever.



    take care

    jim
     
  4. Ta-tsu-wa

    Ta-tsu-wa Member

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    Tired

    Don't be so quick to doubt. Your experience reminds me of a story I once heard:

    In Japan there was a village that was widely regarded for its excellent musicians who were famous throughout the country. Each month the whole village would gather in a large amphitheatre to hear a selection of the musicians play. One month there was great excitement because a traveling master musician was coming to the village. It was said he’d spent years in China learning to play a new flute, the sound of which was so beautiful as to defy all description. He had brought one of the flutes with him from China and tonight the Master was to play his flute in their village amphitheatre.

    When evening came the village people gathered. The curtain on the great stage slowly raised and there, sitting on a simple wooden stool was the Master with his special flute. He played for several minutes and when he was finished he rested the flute in his lap. Stunned silence filled the amphitheatre. Then, from the back of the room came the voice of the village Elder. In barely a whisper he said, “Like a god!”

    The people decided they must have someone from their village become apprenticed to the Master to learn this new flute. They chose the best young student from among all the people. He was a young man, brilliant in music theory, masterful in technique, inspired in interpretation. Everyone in the village contributed the little money they could spare so that the young student would have money to pay for his living expenses and for the apprentice fee to the Master. They gave the student the money they’d collected and he was soon off with the Master, traveling to the Master’s own village.

    There he lived in a small room in the Master’s home where he would eat, sleep and learn to play the new flute. The Master had soon crafted a flute for the student. He gave the young man lessons in how to hold it, how the fingerings were made, and how to blow through it to achieve its unique sound. These the student very quickly mastered. Then he was given a very simple song to practice. He begged the Master for something more challenging and worthy of such a beautiful instrument but the Master insisted the young student practice this very simple piece of music.

    So the student threw himself into his task. He practiced ten or more hours every day. Each evening the Master would come to the student’s room and ask to hear the song. He would close his eyes and sit quietly, patiently listening as his young student played. Every night as the music ended the Master would open his eyes and say, “Something lacking.” Then he would leave so the student could resume practicing.

    At first this “Something lacking” only challenged the student to practice even harder. Instead of spending ten hours a day at practice he would spend twelve hours, then fifteen hours, then twenty hours. He would try variations of blowing into the flute and practice new fingerings until the tips of his fingers were worn raw. Still, each evening when he played for the Master his efforts were greeted only with the now familiar words, “Something lacking.”

    Days became weeks and weeks became months. The student begged the Master to assign him a new piece of music to play but the Master insisted the student continue on practicing the same piece of music. His initial excitement at studying with the Master turned into frustration, then despondency, then at last despair. He feared hearing those dreaded words each night, and inside he knew he was letting down the people of his village because he could not master this new flute.

    As the months came round to almost a year the young student could bear the humiliation of his failure no longer. Broken and disgraced, he gathered together what remained of his money along with his few possessions and he slipped from the house one night as the Master slept, fleeing out into the night.

    For several months the young student wandered. Eventually, with his money almost gone his wandering brought him to the outskirts of his own village. He took the little money remaining and purchased a small hut a few miles from the village. He offered himself as a private music teacher to the local peasant children for a modest fee. In this way he earned just enough so that he had food. He kept to himself and never went into the village, shamed and disgraced as he was. He had taken all the money the villagers had entrusted him with and failed them. He was not worthy to enter their village again or consider himself as one of them.

    So things went for some time. Then one afternoon there came a knock at his door. He opened it to find a few of the villagers, come calling on him. That very night, they told him, there was to be a concert in the amphitheatre, and they begged him to come and perform. At first he declined but the villagers were so persistent and earnest in their asking that at last he relented and agreed to come that night and play.

    The evening came and the young man found himself sitting on a wooden stool on the great stage at the amphitheatre. In his hands he was surprised to find he had chosen to bring the new flute. For an instant he considered running from the stage. He had certainly not prepared to embarrass himself in front of the whole village with this flute. But then he realized he had no pride left to sacrifice. There was nothing left inside to protect or defend. And so he remained sitting until the curtain rose.

    He looked out on all the members of the village who waiting in anticipation. And then he began to play. It was the simple practice tune the Master had given him to play in what seemed like another lifetime. He played the tune for several minutes and when he was finished he rested the flute in his lap. Stunned silence rested over the amphitheatre. Then, from the back of the room came the voice of the village Elder in an awed whisper: “Like a god!”

    I’ve found in my own life that there’s a certain degree of resistance in me that I’m not even conscious of that always seems to be right there, waiting to thwart me as I do my best to become my best. The more effort I put into it, the greater this resistance seems to push back at me. Sometimes, when I’m very lucky, this resistance will force me to give it my all, and I discover “my all” isn’t nearly good enough and seems that it probably never will be.

    Right then, in that moment, I’m drained of all my pride and ambition. It feels like I’ve got nothing left to be prideful of. Then, like that young flautist, if I make one more attempt, I often succeed beyond my wildest dreams. Stranger still, that success feels almost as if it was effortless. It’s akin to a moment of transcendence. You’re a musician. Have you ever been playing an improvisation and suddenly you find yourself playing at a level that is far above your normal level of skill? It flows out of you as though it was someone else playing and you were just there as a listener.

    That’s something like how it feels to play that new flute. There is no “me” involved. It’s just an act of pure creation in whatever it is I’m involved with. But before achieving such a peak moment I have to go through all the work and effort and failure that brings me to the point of being drained of all the ego. Maybe it’s because that “resistance” I mentioned is really just a manifestation of my ego in disguise?

    Whatever the case, having read your story I can’t help but think that you’re probably somewhere near one of those transcendent, peak moments that can come after those crushing experiences. If you can find it inside to pursue your dream I’d bet serious money you’ll find a success beyond anything you ever dared hope for. I would say, “Hang in there,” but you’ve earned more than just “hanging in”. Instead, go out and kick some ass!
     
  5. Montana Keith

    Montana Keith Member

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    First off, please excuse me for sharing a personal story on this thread that isn't related specifically to the practice of EFT. I have been reading this thread and have been touched by the thoughtful postings here.

    Why is it that certain experiences affect us so profoundly? Tired, my heart was touched by your story of “blowing” it when you were asked to play for that guitarist you admired so much. Thank you for being vulnerable and sharing a personal experience that has affected you so profoundly. I had a somewhat similar experience when I was in the 9th grade. Being I’m 50 years old now, this was quite a few years ago. I played the trumpet in the high school band. Besides being the band teacher, Mr. Rowton was also the teacher of my favorite class: history. I really liked the man and still do. One afternoon in band practice, we were practicing the song “Hawaii Five-O.” I really liked this song and felt pretty darn cool when we played it. All of a sudden, Mr. Rowton said, “Stop. Everyone stop.” He then walked over to me and said, “Here Keith, let me see your trumpet.” Surprised, I handed it over to him. He took it, wiped off the mouth piece, and blew a series of clear notes. With a slightly puzzled look on his face, he handed my trumpet back to me and said, “Hmmm. Well, there isn’t anything wrong with the trumpet.”

    I was so embarrassed by this experience that I quit band and never tried to play ANY instrument again.

    One of my favorite things I do each month is to go on a hike along a beautiful mountain stream up the South Fork of Provo Canyon with my younger brother Randy. Back in September, Randy and I had one of our best hikes yet. We hiked for nearly ten miles. I told Randy the story about how I use to love to dance. Here briefly is the story I related.

    At one time, I actually thought I was a pretty good dancer. When I was about nine years old, I was dancing to the song “Christmas Candy” from the album “Snoopy’s Christmas” when my sister Terry, who is 10 and a half years older than me, saw me and asked if I’d like to dance with her. I remember that I was pretty nervous, but I went ahead and danced. She said something to the effect, “Boy, you have good rhythm. You’re a good dancer.” And so all through high school, I went to church dances and had a ball dancing up a storm. This was the mid to late 1970's and the time of disco. I became quite the “disco king” wearing my platform shoes and my plaid bellbottom pants.

    However, as I got older I didn’t dance as much. Once when I was dancing around my house, my family saw me. Unlike years earlier when I was nine, their comments weren’t nearly as encouraging. I don’t remember exactly what they said, but this is how I heard it. “Boy, you look awkward. Please stop moving. I think I’m getting ill.” And so, sometimes early in the morning when none of my family is up yet, I’ll put on some music, and I dance in the dark all by myself.

    When I told Randy this story, something inside of me moved, and I just started to cry. Even as I write this story here, tears well up in my eyes.

    --Keith :)
     
  6. Bhavya

    Bhavya Member

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    Dear Tired,
    As a long-time teacher I can say that your music teacher was out of line, asking you to play an unfamiliar piece in such a setting. While you've been imagining that you let him down, I bet that he was actually feeling guilty for putting you in such a difficult position. Any teacher worth his salt knows that you build up a person's confidence so they can excel!

    I have to agree with some of the comments above. Pick up that guitar and play for yourself. Play for the sheer pleasure of it, the joy of hearing music coming out of your being. It's said that musicians who move into the higher realms in their dreams hear the music of the spheres and then upon waking, put what they've heard down on paper, writing magnificent symphonies. Ask to be a channel for such music. It's a wonderful, spiritual practice and will bring joy to you and I bet to many others as you regain your confidence.

    Wishing you many musical pleasures
    Bhavya
     
  7. Edwin

    Edwin Member

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    You guys rock !
     
  8. `Tired`

    `Tired` Member

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    Good Lord, Edwin's right,

    You guys are absolutely amazing! I read the posts last night after boy's night out and was up until 3 am letting all this sink in. :)

    Jim,

    Thank you for being so thoughtful. I don't want to hijack the thread though. I will admit, I have learned a lot from everyone who has replied and am a very grateful old dog for the words of wisdom and the compassion shown by all who have posted. This is simply outstanding. I hope someday I can return some wisdom.

    Ta-tsu-wa,

    That has to be one of the most inspiring tales I have ever heard or read. I think I understand where you are coming from and what it is you're trying to encourage me to reach for. I could write a chapter (or two) of a book with what I learned from your example. I was just thinking of humility and ego the other day when I first posted on this thread from an experience I had over the weekend. I have learned a lot from this such as, being a perfectionist is ego based and can explain my OCD not to mention having humility is something I used to have before I started filling my "gunny sack". You have taught me something about myself that I used to have but lost long ago, thank you. :)

    What was lacking...was humility and selflessness then? My God that's terribly beautiful. Thank you I needed that as well. :) It reminds me of a time when some friends and I used to get together to just simply jam. I remember those days as being about nothing except the music. There was no "look at me", "listen to me", show-off antics, we were just open to anything musical. We experimented and made our mistakes turn into new directions, nothing was out of bounds. We allowed ourselves to go anywhere on the axis' we felt like going, no rules, no boundaries. Sometimes we all went different directions and met in the middle somehow.

    It got to the point where I felt like I was floating along as if I were exactly what was coming out of my fingers, I lost "me" and became the music, it felt indescribable, if I could live there I would. It was seriously better than sex. I mentioned it to my friends and they all had been having the same experience. It actually became addictive. I made the mistake after one jam of mentioning that losing myself in the music felt better than sex in front of one of my girlfriends...I almost never heard the end of that but it was the truth without a doubt. We did this for almost a year straight, three times a week most weeks, for hours at a time, at first we had maybe 5-10 people come to hear us experiment (private session) and by the time we were winding down at the end of the year we had 90-100 people coming from all around to kick back and listen everytime we gathered. Why that didn't affect my insecurity I think I understand now, even making mistakes in front of many, many people didn't bother me at that point because the music was much bigger than my shortcomings.

    Thank you once again for taking the time to share this and guide me.




    Hi Keith,

    I hope this isn't offensive since you admire your teacher but you simply do not treat someone with disrespect like he did to you. I'm sorry you have had this experience, you should not have had to of dealt with this, ever. If you were out of key, that could easily have been fixed with some training more than likely.

    As far as dancing goes, I don't dance although I went to hear a friend's kid play at a gig the other night, there were some people there that were dancing and I noticed that some people had no rhythm at all but they were completely content, despite some obvious stares, to continue having fun and they did just that, have fun. I believe that is when I started thinking about humility and ego and "people watched" the entire night away. The people that danced like I do were there because it felt good to them and they apparently simply did not care what other people thought. That was an "Aha!" moment for me if there ever has been one. They had no fear of failure, they just were and they made no apologies out there laughing and having fun. I believe the beauty of it all was not watching them dance but the laughs and smiles that they had were so contagious I forgot about my problems and found myself chuckling with joy too.

    I have found the more you get something out in the open the way you just have, the less power it has over you to make you feel bad anymore. It sounds like you had been needing to tell someone such as your brother, how that had made you feel so you could release the pain you feel from your experience. The more you get something like that out in the light the less hold it will have over you, just from my own personal experiences I have found this to be true. You did yourself a favor when you told your brother, I bet you felt like some pressure had been let out of your being afterwards?


    Bhavya,

    Hello :) Out of the many years that have passed and the dissection of this event I have never once thought that my instructor was at fault but looking at it from your point of view is an eyeopener. I just always assumed Dave was infallible and until I read your thread I still had that opinion of him. I knew other people were capable of making mistakes but I never saw Dave as anything but superhuman until I read your post. I believe you're right, when I took my guitar to him to sell to another student he was almost in tears. I didn't even know I was quitting because of what had happened and never put two and two together until now.



    Thanks everyone for being so kind and taking your valuable time and sharing it with me. :) :) This has been very revealing for me and it is beyond awesome how generous you all have been. You people are awesome!

    Peace, God Bless and thank you for the support. :)
     
  9. Ta-tsu-wa

    Ta-tsu-wa Member

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    Tired

    There was a popular painter who used to have a television show on our public broadcast channels in which he taught a simplified painting technique that just about anyone could learn. He dealt mostly in paintings of landscapes, seascapes, mountains, and such.

    One of his favorite little sayings was, "Remember, on our canvas we don't make mistakes. We just have happy little accidents."

    Each show was him painting a full picture in real time in front of the camera. And there were times when he obviously left a mark here or a blob of paint there that he had not intended. His answer was always to take whatever that unexpected "something" was and incorporate it into the painting such that he ended up with details in the finished product that had not been planned but which ultimately resulted in a more interesting painting than his original concept. These are what he called his "happy little accidents".

    Meditation is such a great tool because it takes our ordinary, thinking mind out of the picture or at least greatly reduces its influence. When the iron grip of thought has been interrupted like that some of these other things that lay buried beneath can rise to the surface. That presents us with an opportunity to examine them and sometimes even resolve them. Too often we worry and fret about it when such things come up because they are not always comfortable. As soon as we begin to experience them there's a tendency that causes us to want to make them go away, or to avoid them in the future. Often what we really need to do is let them come up so we can fully examine them.

    It's like when you put a pot on the stove and bring some liquid to a boil while you have the pot completely covered with a lid. If you leave the lid on that way the pot will likely boil over. But if you just remove the lid the contents continue to cook but they recede down from the edges of the pot and don't usually overflow. Examining these things that come up in meditation is a bit like taking the lid off the pot so we can see what's boiling inside. It releases enough pressure that we avoid the boil over, but it also allows things to finish cooking to completion.

    Judging from the feel of your postings it sounds like perhaps your practice of meditation has brought some of these feelings surrounding your guitar experience closer to the surface and prompted you to examine them. Now that you've had a chance to observe them a little, perhaps in a way you never have before, I'm willing to bet when you reflect on the incident it causes you a little less distress now than it might have, say, a week ago. Am I correct? If you continue this kind of work you'll almost certainly find those memories become progressively less intensely painful to you. Ain't meditation great?

    By the way, my father in law was Professor of Classical Guitar at the university in Barranquilla, Colombia. I've listened to him play countless times and you know what? He still makes technical mistakes and blunders. Occasionally I'll spot one and point it out and you know what he says? He just grunts, holds out the guitar and says, "Want to show me how it's supposed to be played?" Sure, like that's gonna happen. My guitar skills begin with Oscar the Octopus and end at the intro to Stairway to Heaven. He long ago quit worrying about perfection. He once told me that obsession with perfection is a sentence of death to excellence. Wise old guy, my father in law.
     
    Last edited: Mar 17, 2009
  10. `Tired`

    `Tired` Member

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    I think I know which artist you're talking about on PBS. Mom used to watch that fellow on PBS whenever he'd come on.

    What I have been finding is that meditation, along with my prayer, not to mention lots of wisdom from other people have been a huge factor in coming to grips with a lot of things that I have intentionally covered up such as the incident in college. I have thought about it before but have buried it as soon as it came up because it was too uncomfortable to deal with. I just became aware of it again while reading this thread although this time it was a lot more transparent, less depressing than it has been the few times it has reared it's head. I'm hoping to come to a final resolution with it so maybe I can continue to move forward.

    What's really interesting is that the things that are popping up and revealing themselves aren't all that intrusive or disturbing anymore (except for a few exceptions) and I can remember details that I couldn't remember before. I find that they're being gently brought up and sometimes resolved in contrast to the way they used to come up leaving me full of negative emotions and more self-hate. I will admit there are some things that have been unexpected intruders that made me extremely uncomfortable and I would have to lay off the meditation for a few days.

    The thing that really makes me feel like the meditation is paying off are the details like I had over the weekend watching the people dance and have fun. The Aha! I had reading this thread plus I am starting to feel and think the way I used to feel and think when I was younger, had some peace and when I was not completely overloaded. Actually sometimes the peace is even deeper than when I was younger, if I could just make it stick and lose the overload. That's something you just can't put a price on after years and years of PTSD is even 30 seconds of peace. Nothing like space to breath.

    I have to say I wouldn't even have the space to breath in if it weren't for my faith and meditation. ;)

    It sounds like your father-in-law is a wise man no questions about it. Perfectionism can drive a person mad. I like his solution to when you point a mistake out. Now that's character. :D


    Peace and God Bless. :)
     
  11. pollyanna

    pollyanna Moderator

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    I am in awe as I read this thread and I am not even going to attempt to put in words everything that comes to mind - it would be like adding an extra ingredient to a recipe that is just right.

    I am just so thankful to be a part of this community of wonderful beings who are helping each other to release supressed emotions which come to the surface allowing each of us to become aware of the joy, love and compassion within.

    Thankyou for all the wonderful stories - I wish you an abundance of peace and joy :) :) :)
     
  12. Fuzzy

    Fuzzy Member

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    I would like to echo Pollyanna's words if I may - I have been reading this thread over the last few days and I have to say that I am humbled to being part of this forum.
    You guys are truly amazing human beings - thank you for sharing your experiences, wisdom, and journey with us.
     
  13. Alison88

    Alison88 Member

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    Hi GilesC

    Thanks for your offer of advice needed re EFT.

    I have been using this technique for a couple of weeks and the first two or three nights I had really disturbing and vivid dreams. Is this quite normal when beginning EFT?

    Kind regards.

    Alison
     
  14. GilesC

    GilesC Member

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    Hi Alison,

    As with any energy work, whether it's Meditation, Reiki, EFT or whatever, as we start to clear up what we recognise as our issues, we can find that the underlying issues behind them can start to surface. So, for example, you may tap on the issue that you are angry at a certain person for something they said and you clear that away and feel better about that person, but then you find yourself getting more emotional, having dreams etc. about other things. With dreams it can be a little tricky to actually associate what you are dreaming with any specific event in the past, whereas waking emotions you are more likely to be able to pinpoint that some past event keeps coming into your mind. The simplest thing to do, regardless of how these things manifest, is to just tap on them as feels right. "Even though I had that disturbing dream last night about...., I deeply..." ;)

    This is one of the benefits I have found with FreewayCER as, more often than not, when we clear an present day issue, it seems to automatically propogate back through associated past events which, if we are aware of what such events are, we can put ourselves back there and 'test' to see what emotions arise; which is usually very little or nothing. Of course, for some complex issues, there will be things and this is when it requires some dedication on the part of the client to actually want to deal with them and remember to use the techniques given, whether it be Freeway, EFT, Emotrance or whatever, to clear them up as and when they come up. Also, a good practitioner will be happy to make themselves available (within reason ;) ) to the client should they need to contact them for advise if they are struggling with something.

    So... get tapping. :D

    Hugs

    Giles
     
  15. Alison88

    Alison88 Member

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    Thanks so much for your reply Giles.

    It was so apparent that the EFT had brought these dreams about as I rarely remember a dream and barely ever have disturbing dreams.

    Having read your reply, I will definately keep going with the tapping. My kids find it a little strange and laugh a lot at it but have both told me that it makes them feel relaxed. My 9 year old daughter has a bit of a phobia about birds (I think it stems back to the time one of our chickens walked through the french doors into our living room and took Rachel by complete surprise). Well the other evening she saw a pigeon sitting on the window ledge of her bedroom looking in and, to say it freaked her out, is an understatement. She was crying uncontrollably. I closed her curtains and sat on her bed and did the tapping routine on her something like ' even though I have a fear of birds, etc, etc, then: even though I don't like their beaks, their eyes etc etc, I'm ok. It was amazing because literally 5 minutes later, she was calm and fell asleep!!

    What a fantastic tool.

    Thanks again for your reassurance.

    Alison x
     
  16. GilesC

    GilesC Member

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    :) That's great Alison. It's good when you can get the whole family involved.

    If another bird comes along and makes Rachel upset, remind her (if she remembers) of the time the chicken came through and suprised her (as you say this is likely to be the root cause of the issue) and get, in her own words, a description of what she feels now about when that happened. e.g. if she says "That silly chicken scared me" then you can tap with her on the phrase "Even though that silly chicken scared me...".

    In a sense you are becoming the practitioner and she is the client.
    The two important things to remember is a) use the clients own words (don't put words into their mouths) and b) ensure that the phrase you are using specifically identifies the event in question.

    Let us know how you get on, with that and anything else you work on that you care to share. Every experience is beneficial for other people to learn from.

    Hugs

    Giles
     
  17. Alison88

    Alison88 Member

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    Thanks very much for that Giles. I'm so pleased with that recommendation as I was using my words and not my daughters. I don't think she is sure of the root cause of the fear - there was also an occassion when we were sitting by a lake when a cheeky goose crept up behind my son and pecked him on the back - my daughter saw that happen and seemed to find it funny at the time. I will definately talk to her about where she thinks her fear of birds stems from and tap on the relevant things that come up for her.

    I will let you know how I get on.

    Thanks again.

    Alison x
     

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