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5 weeks in

Discussion in 'START HERE: Registration & Introductions' started by Cody, Apr 21, 2010.

  1. Cody

    Cody Member

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    Hello everybody. My name is Cody and I have completed four weeks of meditation with lifeflow 10 and it has really made a difference in my life albeit I still have a long way to go. I have always been a glass half empty type of guy always thinking the worst. I am still having issues with that but it is getting better. I tend to catch myself more when I start having negative thoughts and try to turn it around to a positive.
    Six weeks ago I had a scare with my health, caused by high blood pressure, that really shook me up and sent me into a anxiety frenzy. Do not think it is anything to serious , main cause is most likely strees related, but got me thinking obout my mortality and came to the realization that I am not 10' tall and bullet proof like I thought when I was in my 20's and early 30's (currently 37). I guess I am having what you call a mid life crisis. I find myself constantly thinking obout my health and that every ache and pain I have might be caused by something serious and life threatening. Of course this is just my mind over reacting to something that I have no control over and is just part of the aging process.
    Today was a really stressful day and when I got home I was tired and sick to my stomach with no apetite. I meditated for 30min with lifeflow 9 and instantly felt much better and refreshed. Got my apetite back and was able to finish a full meal and relax. Also before I meditated my blood pressure whas around 130 over 90 with heart rate between 90-100. After I meditated with lifeflow it droped to 110 over 75 with heart rate around 75-80. This is huge and really gives me peace of mind that meditating with lifeflow is making a difference with my health.
    I am looking forward to experincing the remaining lifeflow downloads in the months to come. Reading everybodys posts on this site also made me realize that I am not alone and that with meditation life can get better and easier to deal with. Thank you and good luck to all.
     
  2. GilesC

    GilesC Member

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    Hi Cody and welcome to the Project Meditation community.

    Good to see you're finding benefit from the Lifeflow tracks, they really are a good investment.

    I won't ask why you think 37 is "mid-life" and that the aches and pains are part of the "ageing process". Eeek, I've just turned 38, and I certainly wouldn't consider it mid-life, or ageing (Still think I'm about 23 ;) ).

    Anyway, keep up the meditation. It will most definitely help. :)

    Hugs

    Giles
     
  3. Edwin

    Edwin Member

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    I'm 35 now...

    I have suffered from anxiety attacks a few years back, when I realised that some day it will all end... :eek:

    This will pass. Stick with meditation and stick with us, and in a few years the Cody you think you are today will have transformed completely !:cool:
     
  4. Ta-tsu-wa

    Ta-tsu-wa Member

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    Cody,

    I got a chuckle from your description about not being bullet proof anymore. Most of guys have some experience like that in our lives. Mine came just about age 30.

    I went to my garage to workout and started lifting weights to see how much I could manage to get over my head in the clean and jerk. As a youth this was a favorite activity for my friends and I and the guy who could lift the most was accredited certain bragging rights. That night in my garage that old curiosity began to stir.

    I'd try one lift after another, each time increasing the weight until I had I think about 250lbs. on the bar. I got the weight to my chest when a thought occurred to me I'd never before had in my life. I said to myself, "I'm pretty certain I can get this over my head, but even if I'm successful at it I might still injure myself."

    I stood there for what seemed an eternity contemplating the meaning of this novel idea. It had never before occurred to me that I could be successful and still get injured. Before that the worst that could have happened (to my way of thinking) was that I might not be able to lift the weight. Finally I set the weight down without finishing the lift. When I walked back in the house I was mortal for the first time in my life. It's funny to look back on experiences like that now and to think that I had ever been naive enough to believe otherwise.

    Your description of nausea and loss of appetite remind me very much of symptoms associated with GAD or Generalized Anxiety Disorder. It's a scary sounding name but simple enough to get rid of in most cases provided you use the right tools.

    I'm guessing you've experienced one or more outright anxiety or panic attacks, yes? These are those episodes that cause you to feel as though you're somehow right on the verge of some medical issue that will kill you, like a heart attack, inability to get enough air, a stroke, and so forth. These things are really frightening when they happen to you and anyone who's ever had such a panic attack knows they aren't something you ever want to go through a second (or third or more) time.

    Often the fear of such a repeat is at the heart of GAD. Think of it like this:

    Once you've had a panic attack your body enlists the services of a little watchman inside to alert you in case another such attack should be headed your way. This little man does nothing 24/7 but watch, take notes, evaluate, and hit the red alert button each time he thinks he spots something that might be connected with another panic attack. He's on duty night and day, and doesn't even quit while you're sleeping.

    We all have some sort of early warning system like this. The difference between those who experience GAD and those who don't is that the non-GAD folks have watchmen that believe in taking breaks, lunches, vacations, and in going to sleep at night. My watchman, thankfully, seems to be a rather lethargic and lazy fellow, preferring to take extended lunch breaks until there is genuinely something that deserves to be observed. Those with GAD have watchmen who never take breaks for any reason. Over time this persistent state of alert begins to wear you out. You could think of it like driving a car, pressing on the accelerator while also stomping down on the brake the entire time. In relatively short order you begin to wear out both your brake and your engine.

    That's GAD. It isn't the acute, overpowering sense of panic, but it's that niggling undercurrent of hyperawareness that never takes a break. You'll experience it as a general sense of unease, nausea, mild vertigo, loss of appetite, poor quality sleep, perhaps even unusually vivid or troublesome dreams when you do sleep, and a host of other symptoms.

    This sounds unpleasant, but compared to how an outright panic attack feels most GAD suffers feel like they could accept the GAD if they could just insure they'd never experience another panic attack. Anyone who's ever experienced a truly intense panic attack would gladly take GAD over panic.

    Here's the problem though. That little watchman who's at the root of the GAD itself is also the one in charge of being on the lookout for panic events. He brings on the GAD and then observes it to see if the GAD itself is evidence of an impending panic attack. The more he observes it, the louder he rings the bell alerting you to panic. It's a self-perpetuating cycle.

    It's a bit like watching a dog chase its own tail in a circle. The dog is both the one doing the chasing as well as the one being chased, only the dog doesn't know that. To him that tail appears to have a life and existence all its own. He thinks it's something "other" that he can pursue until he captures it. This illusion is what keeps him going at the game.

    So it is with your little watchman and GAD. Unaware that he is at the root of the feelings and symptoms associated with GAD, he treats them as if they were independent and therefore a threat. To really rid yourself permanently of GAD and panic attacks you must first get the dog to understand that when he's chasing that tail he's really just chasing himself. It really won't work well to take the attitude that you can live with GAD as long as you don't have to deal with full blown panic attacks because sooner or later the GAD is going to act as the catalyst for panic and anxiety issues. Barring some actual medical basis for the panic (which I presume your physician has already ruled out,) to rid yourself of panic you'll want to rid yourself of the GAD, not settle for putting up with it.

    There are many good and effective options open to you. In my opinion one of the very best things you can do is to learn a specific technique such as the Release Technique or the Sedona Method. Using one of these techniques or something similar, focus on letting go of that underlying GAD. Once that's accomplished the root of the problem has been torn out and the more extreme anxiety issues are often no longer in the picture.

    The basics of these release methods are available for free and someone (I believe it may have been Giles) provided a wonderful post on this forum that contained a step-by-step explanation for releasing. One of the benefits of such a technique is that results are often felt immediately with respect to an acute problem, with relief from whatever issue you're working on becoming more pronounced over time.

    Search the forum for threads dealing with the Release Technique or the Sedona Method. I believe there is at least one entire thread dedicated to this topic. In any event if you do a search I'm sure you'll find the post I mentioned with those rather comprehensive instructions for practice. Of course meditation and using the Lifeflow tracks will also aid you in this and many other ways. One thing I've personally noted about using some form of release technique is that they are generally very focused and intensive ways of relaxing the body consciously. In fact the inventor of the Progressive Relaxation technique said towards the end of his life that based on his studies he had concluded that virtually all anxiety disorders were a direct product of holding too much physical tension in the body and that given a way to relax completely all anxiety could be permanently cured. If the Release or Sedona methods are in fact very focused methods of conscious relaxation that might explain why they seem to be so successful at dealing with anxiety and panic problems. If it were me I might consider practicing the Release Technique while using Lifeflow to enhance the relaxation practice.
     
  5. osamipo

    osamipo Member

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    Progressive muscle relaxation

    Great post, Ta-tsu-wa

    Cody, i would also strongly suggest:
    Sedona Method (or Release Technique),
    EFT (emotinal freedom technique) for which you can find free instructions on the web and specific demonstrations on youtube
    Progressive muscle relaxation that Ta-tsu-wa also mentions is a very good method for anxiety disorders.

    There are 3 "channels" through which anxiety (and any other emotion for that matter) manifests itself:

    1. subjective experience of emotion (being aware of emotion)
    2. changes in behaviour (like avoiding specific situations, people etc.) and
    3. physiological changes (muscle tension, sweathig, blushing, heart pounding...)

    Progressive musle relaxation (PMR) works on the third. It consists of sistematically tensing, holding tension and then releasing tension (relaxing) muscle groups. In this way, your body "learns" the difference between tension and real relaxed musle. It works both "right away" - because when you tense your muscle(s) to the max and then relax it, it just, physiologically, must relieve the tension (pendulum principle) and also "in the long run" - that is that your body gradually learns to automatically relieve tensed muscle(s). Muscle tension is, btw, both effect and a cause of anxiety. It is effect because it is triggered by "frightening thought", perceived danger or so, and is a cause because when you are tense your mind automatically interprets it as "something is wrong" and generating more worrying, negative self-talk... (talking about vicious circle :() By practicing PMR on a regular basis you can gradually weaken and eventually brek this circle. Instructions on PMR are also available free, just type it on web search engine :) There are a few versions of it, but either will work with persistance

    Keep meditating also ;)
    Alex
     
  6. Ta-tsu-wa

    Ta-tsu-wa Member

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    Release instructions

    Cody,

    I located that post I mentioned above. Actually, there are two posts and their author was in fact Montana Keith. Here's what he wrote:

    In a somewhat more detailed post he then wrote:

    Perhaps this overview of the Sedona instructions will give you a beginning point from which you can work. Best wishes.
     
  7. Cody

    Cody Member

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    Ta-tsu-wa and Osamipo -Thank you both for taking the time to research this information. It is very helpful. The sedona method is something that I will definetly try. Looks like it will compliment the lifeflow nicely. Thank you all for the help and support.
     
  8. osamipo

    osamipo Member

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    You’re welcome ;)

    Sedona method really is a gret companion to LifeFlow and any meditation. You can also order free demo DVD from ther website (not just a "catch", it is pretty valuable piece of info).

    Actually, in one study Sedona method and Progressive muscle relaxation were compared in reducing stress and SM was superior to most aspects exept in reducing muscle tension (and even there it was like 29% to 26% in PMR favor)

    Cheers,
    Alex
     
    Last edited: Apr 26, 2010
  9. Gutte

    Gutte Member

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    You know...

    The human body is build to get 140 years of age if handle with care.
    I myself strike to get at least a 116 years of age, it is my goal to see the other side of the year 2100 in this life. ;)

    I wont be like all others dragging me down, I am a young man till the day i die. I hate people telling me that we are getting old, I AM young and nothing is going to change that from my inner working. :)

    Love Gutte
     
  10. Ta-tsu-wa

    Ta-tsu-wa Member

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    How are things coming, Cody? Have you been able to incorporate a little of that release work into your practice?
     
  11. Cody

    Cody Member

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    Hello Ta-tsu-wa,
    Everything is coming along fine, thanks for asking. Still have my moments but they are few and far between. I have been practicing some of what I have learned from Hale Dwoskin's release method course in conjunction with lifeflow for the last week and a half and it seems to be helping a bit. Still have a ways to go though. I know it will get better with time and practice. I do feel that I have been able to achieve a more relaxed state these past few days during meditation and assume it is due to my mind being quiter from releasing. Only time will tell.

    Gutte -
    I no longer feel that I am getting older and look forword to growing younger with each passing moment. :)
     
  12. GilesC

    GilesC Member

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    I plan to live forever.
    So far so good. ;)

    Hugs

    Giles
     

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